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Baby Product Reviews

Gadgets and new innovations for babies and their parents.

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Real toy shapes interact with iPad
Noted by Time Magazine as one of the “toys that will make your kids smarter,” Tiggly Shapes develops motor skills, spatial thinking, creativity, and language. Toddlers toy with tablets, the company says, and “you might think it’s crazy to let a youngster touch such a pricey device,” but Tiggly Shapes encourages it. [ More ]
Toy is like a tree house
Your child’s senses will be running wild as they explore and discover ball play, shape sorting, turning gears and more. VTech says its Grow & Discover Tree House has so many fun activities, “your little one will never want to come out from their tree house play tent.” And that’s a good thing, as the toy “provides a variety of activities to stimulate toddlers senses and help develop important motor skills.” Babies can drop the balls through the holes and watch them roll, sort the shape sorters, or use the fabric to play peek-a-boo or hide and seek. [ More ]
“See” your child before conception
How will your genetics combine with those of your spouse? A new service can emulate your potential embryo by virtually mixing DNA. The technique is primarily aimed at letting parents screen out genetic disorders. But GenePeeks’ science will also, according to its patent, show eye and skin pigmentation, height and waist size, and more. [ More ]
Snap and Surprise camera
No, it doesn’t actually take a picture. The Snap and Surprise camera is all about “colorful role-play,”  Vtech says. It has fun mechanical features, such as a light-up lens your baby can spin, and a slider “to choose images for imitative play.” When the shutter button is pressed, it doesn’t snap an exposure, but a “cute puppy pops out of hiding for some peek-a-boo fun.” The Snap and Surprise Camera “is sure to make your baby smile.” It’s $12 here. [ More ]
Translating a baby’s cry
Why is your baby crying? Some scientists believe they can translate the variations in the crying to determine just what the infant would like to communicate. And now you can understand as well with the Biloop Cry Translator. In 3 seconds it will tell you the reason for crying, the developer claims. [ More ]
iPad addicted infants ‘unable to use toy building blocks’?
The Association of Teachers and Lecturers warn that rising numbers of children are unable to perform simple tasks such as using building blocks because of overexposure to iPads, according to a report by the UK’s Telegraph. Rising numbers of infants lack the motor skills needed to play with building blocks because of an “addiction” to tablet computers and smartphones, the Telegraph adds. [ More ]
Babies on FaceTime: what are they thinking?
When adults and even children use video conferencing, we of course recognize that the screen is merely showing us an image of someone far away as we speak. Babies? Not so much. Science News reports on a new study looking at how young children respond to video calls. [ More ]
If only they worked: “Mute button” pacifiers
Two companies are offering tongue-in-cheek pacifiers with “mute buttons” to muffle a babies incessant sounds. “Sometimes you just need your little angel to be a little less…noisy,” says Personalized Pacifiers. Its Mute Button Pacifier “is the perfect way to please your baby,” the company says, and is made of non-toxic, hygienically formed, natural bite-resistant materials designed to form naturally in the mouth, “satisfying babies need for supplemental sucking and providing parents with peace of mind.” It’s $5 here. [ More ]
Fun ways to early reading skills
With the AlphaZoo Spinner, children can “press and spin their way to early reading skills,” LeapFrog says. Toddlers can listen and learn the names of the letters when in Letter mode, and the names and sounds of animals when in Animal mode, “all while building gross and fine motor skills. [ More ]